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Few phenomena embody the notion of time like fashion. Rooted in the now, fashion creates its past through a process of rapid style change. It moves with speed and is always on the verge of becoming something else. The current era, which we might call “industrial time, ” identifies the seasonal nature of fashion as an industry and shows its impact on workers, consumers, and the environment alike. Over time it has devised increasingly efficient responses to market demand, reducing the duration of the design, production, and distribution phases; in the mid-1980s, the development of the “quick response” approach enabled fashion to speed up distribution between manufacturers and stores, accelerating the flow of sales data from the latter, and contributing to the creation of the Fast Fashion phenomenon. In the face of this, however, came the so-called Slow Fashion. Such expression was born on the “slow food” model, launched by a group of Italian activists in the 1980s in opposition to the spread at that time of fast food chains, such as McDonald’s, to indicate a production system that respects workers’ rights and the environment. The development of this phenomenon, gained momentum as high fashion began to put into circulation the strategy based on “see now buy now,” thus consistently reducing the time between fashion shows and in-store availability of new collections. Consumers began to show increased sensitivity to fashion, directing their demand toward products in line with the seasonal fashions “imposed” on the catwalks and beginning to buy clothes more for their pleasure than for an actual need.  We at Zer0W will never tire of repeating: a business system having these characteristics only produces serious environmental and social effects; making clothes generally requires the use of a lot of water, chemicals, and the emission of significant amounts of greenhouse gases. Increasingly, situations of exploitation of garment factory workers emerge because they are underpaid and exposed to unsafe working conditions.  Fast fashion, therefore, may not be all that convenient for the environment and society. By compressing production cycles and making designs that are always up-to-date, fashion companies have enabled buyers not only to expand their closets but also to update them quickly. Heike Jenss, professor of fashion studies at Parsons School of Design in New York, argues that fashion can be seen as ” a material way of ‘making time,’ perhaps as an effort to make time and the present, materially graspable. To wear fashion is therefore to ‘wear time.'”Let us, therefore, dress it as long and as well as possible. Without waste.

Few phenomena embody the notion of time like fashion. Rooted in the now, fashion creates its past through a process of rapid style change. It moves with speed and is always on the verge of becoming something else.

The current era, which we might call “industrial time, ” identifies the seasonal nature of fashion as an industry and shows its impact on workers, consumers, and the environment alike. Over time it has devised increasingly efficient responses to market demand, reducing the duration of the design, production, and distribution phases; in the mid-1980s, the development of the “quick response” approach enabled fashion to speed up distribution between manufacturers and stores, accelerating the flow of sales data from the latter, and contributing to the creation of the Fast Fashion phenomenon. In the face of this, however, came the so-called Slow Fashion. Such expression was born on the “slow food” model, launched by a group of Italian activists in the 1980s in opposition to the spread at that time of fast food chains, such as McDonald’s, to indicate a production system that respects workers’ rights and the environment. The development of this phenomenon, gained momentum as high fashion began to put into circulation the strategy based on “see now buy now,” thus consistently reducing the time between fashion shows and in-store availability of new collections. Consumers began to show increased sensitivity to fashion, directing their demand toward products in line with the seasonal fashions “imposed” on the catwalks and beginning to buy clothes more for their pleasure than for an actual need.

 

We at Zer0W will never tire of repeating: a business system having these characteristics only produces serious environmental and social effects; making clothes generally requires the use of a lot of water, chemicals, and the emission of significant amounts of greenhouse gases. Increasingly, situations of exploitation of garment factory workers emerge because they are underpaid and exposed to unsafe working conditions.

Fast fashion, therefore, may not be all that convenient for the environment and society. By compressing production cycles and making designs that are always up-to-date, fashion companies have enabled buyers not only to expand their closets but also to update them quickly. Heike Jenss, professor of fashion studies at Parsons School of Design in New York, argues that fashion can be seen as ” a material way of ‘making time,’ perhaps as an effort to make time and the present, materially graspable. To wear fashion is therefore to ‘wear time.’”

Let us, therefore, dress it as long and as well as possible. Without waste.

 

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